December 20, 2016
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Fed Raises Rates

Last week was mixed for the markets, as the Dow increased by 0.44%, while the S&P 500 lost 0.06%, the NASDAQ dropped 0.13%, and the MSCI EAFE gave back 0.55%. We also saw a variety of data released, giving a similarly mixed view of recent economic activity. Retail sales and the Consumer Price Index showed modest gains, while industrial production and housing starts both declined. The biggest headline from last week, however, was a development the market anticipated for quite some time: The Federal Reserve decided to raise its benchmark interest rates – for only the second time since 2006.   Why did the Fed raise rates? The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC), the group of Fed officials who meet to determine interest rates and other policies choices, has a mandate to “foster maximum employment and price stability.” In its quest to uphold this mandate, the FOMC aims to keep inflation at 2%, as this level can help support accurate financial forecasting and decisions while preventing harmful deflation. The act of adjusting interest rates can help control inflation and support economic strength. At its most basic, when the Fed lowers rates, they are indicating that the economy is contracting – […]
August 23, 2016

NASDAQ Posts Eighth Week of Gains

NASDAQ Posts Eighth Week of Gains WEEKLY UPDATE – August 22, 2016 The S&P 500 and Dow ended last week slightly lower, but the NASDAQ posted an eighth straight week of gains for the first time since 2010.[1] For the week, the S&P 500 lost 0.01%, the Dow fell 0.13%, the NASDAQ gained 0.10%,and the MSCI EAFE lost 0.64%.[2] What is the Fed thinking? Minutes from the July Federal Reserve Open Market Committee meeting showed that officials are split about the economic outlook and when to raise interest rates. Hawkish rhetoric from Fed members who favor a rate hike soon could push the central bank into raising rates as early as September. More dovish officials aren’t convinced that tepid inflation will rise to the Fed’s 2.0% objective and favor a wait-and-see approach to raising interest rates.[3] After several months of strong labor market gains, some economists think the economy is close to full employment and central bankers should move soon to put on the brakes by raising interest rates. If the economy gets overheated, prices could rise too much and push the economy into a boom/bust cycle that federal officials are anxious to avoid. While a few years of outsized growth […]