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What to Do If You Suspect You Have Received an IRS Phishing Scam Email

Tax Tip Tuesday Financial Blog Post

We all receive many email messages. As we read them we assume that they are actually from the person they claim to be from… especially if the email looks and sounds official. However, if you receive one from the Internal Revenue Service, you have just gotten an IRS phishing scam email. These scams are generally carried out through unsolicited emails or websites, and will typically request personal or financial information including requests for passwords, PIN numbers, or any information concerning your credit cards, banks, and other financial accounts. 

When it comes to contact with the IRS, the agency WILL NEVER contact you via email or text message. Nor will they request personal or financial information including requests for passwords, PIN numbers,  or any information concerning your credit cards, banks, and other financial accounts.

If you receive suspicious communication from what appears to be the IRS, here are the steps you should take.

What to do if you get an email or unsolicited text messages claiming to be from the IRS and requesting personal information you should:

  1. Never reply to the email.
  2. Never open any attachments. Many times these could possibly contain malicious codes that could infect a computer or mobile phone.
  3. Never click the links.
  4. Forward the email as-is to the IRS at phishing@irs.govForward the text as-is to the IRS at 202-552-1226. Standard text messaging rates apply.
  5. Immediately delete the original email or text.

What to do if you visit a website that appears to be the IRS you should:

  1. Email the URL of the suspicious site to phishing@irs.gov.
  2. Include “suspicious website” in the subject line of the email.

If you click on a link in a phishing email or text, or on a site you believe is bogus, you can visit the identity protection page for more information on steps to take to protect you private information.

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